Wisdom #74 – Sticky Notes & Subway Therapy

We need to talk. Based on my news feeds I clearly see that people are hurting.

Since Tuesday, I have been getting a lot of phones calls and text messages from friends who need to vent, or work through their feelings. I don’t feel being a sound board is a enough, not this time.

I want to create a safe space. A space for people to sit in a circle, in community and talk about what they are feeling in ways that we aren’t used to doing.

There is a collective mourning, a great loss that is bigger then anything we have ever lost before. While we can put labels on what we have lost, I feel we have yet to learn that there is far more that we lost beyond what we can currently know or see.

Take time to express your emotions and write out what you are feeling in a journal. Create art if you feel called to do so. But do not bottle up your emotions. Bottled up emotions is what brought us here.

Today’s wisdom is a make-shift art therapy wall of expression. It’s from a Gothamist article called Thousands of NYers Share Their Post-Election Grief with Sticky Notes & Subway Therapy by Gaby Del Valle.

As you read it ask yourself, how can you be an agent of love and light?

Thousand of NYers Share Their Post-Election Grief with Sticky Notes & Subway Therapy

During her concession speech yesterday, Hillary Clinton uttered a simple, terrifying sentence: “Donald Trump is going to be our president.” For many Americans—New Yorkers especially—the sickening reality of a Trump presidency is impossible to fathom. A few hours later, a rogue therapist set up shop in the 14th Street tunnel between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. Armed with a few pens and hundreds of blank sticky notes, he encouraged people to share their thoughts about the presidential election and stick them on the wall for others to see.

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(Aries Dela Cruz / Gothamist)

“Because of how stressful the last couple of days were, I thought it would be nice to have something that people could do really quickly so that they could maybe get something off their chest,” Levee, the artist behind Subway Therapy told ABC 7.

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(Aries Dela Cruz / Gothamist)

The messages affixed to the wall expressed everything from hope, despair, confusion, shock, and fear for the future.  […]

According to Subway Therapy’s Instagram, upwards of 1,500 people participated in the sticky note installation. Later that night, thousands of New Yorkers marched in protest of Trump’s presidency.